Posts Tagged ‘social media’

Is a LinkedIn endorsement as valuable as a recommendation?

LinkedIn has recently introduced the endorsement feature making it very easy for your connections to endorse you for the skills you have in your profile, which raises the issue of having a great profile and making sure your skills are complete and prioritised but we’ll talk about that in another post.

Now I use LinkedIn to source leads for my businesses, but it is also one of my major sources of good suppliers for me. And I use it to find out more about he businesses I work with before a project starts.  So I’m a little sceptical about the benefit of these endorsements on your profile.

I am a huge fan of good recommendations. Not the ones that say “I met Philippa at a meeting and she was lovely” – which are great for the ego, but they don’t really help me when I want to find a new service provider, or to learn about the people I work with. 

Want to really make your linkedIn profile more interesting?

 

One of the biggest complaints on Linkedin has been the difficulty in adding media rich items to your profile. Before you had to embed a video into a slide share or google presentation but now there is a little icon you need to make your friend.

linkedin media add in icon

 

this little square with a plus beside it allows you to add a portfolio, presentation, photo or video as long as it has an http:// address attached to it.

We backed the bid, now we really need to back team GB, using social media of course!

 

I’ve spent my weekend glued to the TV, the pc and my phone – why? Well I’m a huge fan of the Olympics whatever country they’re held in. So to have them on the doorstep is a real thrill and I’m loving the fact we can access every minute of every event. (I’m also looking forward to seeing some things live next week but that’s another story…..).

Put the Social Back in Social Media

We all know that social media is here to stay; the chances are you might have found out about this blog through social media. The stats make it obvious that we need to incorporate social media into our business – Erik Qualman of Socionomics believes your return on investment for Social Meid is that your business will exist in 5 years.

But I am often asked the similarities and difference between online and offline networking. Much of the work I do is with clients is with people who are out and about, meeting people face to face , shaking hands , handing out business cards and generally just being out there meeting people.

But I will tell you that there are a lot of the same rules that apply to your in person networking also apply to your online networking.

What I am going to do today is just give you a couple of these “rules” for you to consider when you are networking online.

So a lot of people forget the social side of both networking and social media.  It’s funny because the clue is in the name with SOCIAL media.  However, the number of times that I connect with someone on Facebook or Twitter , and the next thing I know I’ve got a message or an email  introducing me to their “get rich quick” or online marketing scheme. Now I am going to use the word scheme in a broad sense because it signifies that not understanding, just not getting, what it is I am looking for, that makes it a scheme even when it may be a very valid kind of business.

Work Less, Achieve More

Can I let you in on a little secret? Next year is going to be the year when I work less yet achieve more in terms of results for my business – AND I am going to help as many people as possible along the way to do the same thing.

Interested? Intrigued?

I was thinking about the military. In a military campaign, when the armies need to move forwards, Advance, the person that gives the order is not the person in the thick of it moving the line forwards. Business really needs to be the same. In order for our businesses to advance we need to be the person giving the command, not the foot soldier in the thick of it doing all of the work to make it happen.

Let me share with you what I believe are the 5 keys to being able to work less and achieve more by being, effectively, the person that gives the “Advance” command.

How important is Facebook to your business?

Social media isn’t going away any time soon, so platforms such as Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter will have an impact on our businesses – or will they?

How do you use the social media available to market your business?  Does the information that 100,000 people in the UK have left Facebook recently worry you at all?

All this social media stuff doesn’t work!

So many people scoff when I tell them how active I am on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Ecademy and about 30 other networks.  “I don’t have time for all that,” they say, “It’s a time waster – and, anyway, it doesn’t work.”

“What do you want it to do?”  I ask.

It’s a question guaranteed to stop most people in their tracks.  The responses I get vary from a shrug to a bit of preliminary mumbling followed by “More sales!”

I can be really horrible and ask a lot more tough questions (I was trained as a coach once) like:

“Do you like people selling to you on social media?”

“Do you have a marketing strategy for your business?”

“How much time to do you invest in networking offline?”

I’ve tried asking some of these questions, but they scare people!

So here’s my opportunity to explain about why social media doesn’t work – and how it can work very well indeed.

History lesson

Social media has been around since the 1990s, Ecademy launched in 1998.  LinkedIn appeared early in 2003, followed by Facebook in 2004 and Twitter in 2006.  They’re not going away so people who don’t use their free services are missing a marketing opportunity.

Activity

Social media needs consistency – so one tweet a fortnight isn’t enough.  If you’re not making any noise people don’t know you’re there.  If you have a Facebook business page you need to keep it active, it won’t happy all on its own.  If you have a LinkedIn profile you need to be seen in groups and on the Q&A section for people to know you exist and get to know you.

Time management

The time issue is important – it’s true that you can get distracted and find a morning or afternoon has disappeared if you’re not careful.  However, most people are willing to attend one networking meeting a week to promote their business and meet people who may either become customers or refer them to others who need their products or services.

The challenge for most people is that it’s easy to get sucked in and spend half a day chatting to people about inconsequential trivia.  I’m not suggesting you shouldn’t have conversations, but they should be a conscious investment of time.

The average networking event lasts a couple of hours plus travelling time.  It’s part of your marketing effort – why would you not be willing to invest three hours a week in marketing online too?

Lord Sugar and the Telegraph corner shop

As a marketeer I’m always on the lookout for inspirational ideas and stories about how businesses and business people are successful in marketing their products and services.  Few business people will fail to recognise the face of Alan Sugar, even fewer will fail to acknowledge the value of reading his autobiography – What you see is what you get. I’m currently about half the way through it and thoroughly enjoying the read. Apart from it giving me an insight into the man, it is also challenging a key tenet of my belief about the value of low pricing as part of a marketing strategy. The Amstrad strategy was always built on “stack them high and sell them cheap” and without a doubt it was a successful ploy; the company made millions that way. In my marketing workshops I advise small and medium sized businesses to avoid this strategy and to focus on quality and customer care because only the big boys with massive buying power can win in a low price war; it’s a well documented marketing theory and one that’s easily understood. Once the undercutting begins, only the player with the biggest and deepest pockets can win out.